The Secrets of Yin Yoga

The sensation in the body after a Yin Yoga pose is often referred to as the rebound effect or the echo of the pose. I often describe this sensation as a resonance. If you have ever rung a bell or gong, you know the sound is the strongest initially and then dissipates over time, until you eventually no longer hear the sound at all. The resonant sensation of a Yin pose in the body is like that.

-Nyk Danu– 2020 VYC Teacher 

Nyk Danu (C-IATY, CYA-ERYT 550) is a Therapeutic Yoga Teacher and Yin Yoga Teacher Trainer.

In addition to numerous Therapeutic, Restorative and Yin Yoga intensives, she holds the following teacher training certificates:

– 300 hour Yoga teacher training – The Yoga College Of Canada
– 500 hour + advanced Yin Yoga Teaching certificate – Paul Grilley
– 1000 hour Yoga Therapy Certification – Ajna Yoga College

Nyk has also completed 2,300 hours of Chinese Medicine studies and 360 hours of additional Bio-medical studies at Pacific Rim College.
Nyk has been practicing Yoga since 1998. In 2003 she took her first Yoga teacher training and has been teaching Yoga since 2004.
In 2007 Nyk fell madly in love with Yin Yoga and has been studying with her teacher Paul Grilley ever since.
Her personal practice and her Yoga classes are rooted in Buddhism, Taoism and Traditional Chinese Medicine.

Nyk Believes:
Yoga has the power to transform lives and change the world.
That if you can breathe you can do Yoga.
Yoga makes life better.

Nyk is on a mission to make Yoga accessible to people who don’t think they are ‘Yoga people’ The ‘Yoga MisFits’ Nyk is an expert in teaching those who aren’t human pretzels.
Her writing has been featured by The Yoga and Body Image Coalition, Elephant Journal and The Tattooed Buddha.

Nyk is regularly interviewed on podcasts on the subjects of accessibility in Yoga, Yin Yoga, and The Business of Yoga.

If you haven’t practiced Yin Yoga before, you may be surprised at how different it is than more active forms of Yoga. The focus of Yin Yoga is quite unique. In more active or Yang forms of Yoga, the focus is typically on building strength and flexibility in the muscles, as well as internal warmth. This is done by doing shorter holds in the poses and repetition of dynamic movements. In Yin Yoga, the focus is on targeting the connective tissues, fascia and joints. This has a profoundly different feeling in the tissues as well as the nervous and energetic systems of the body. 

New To Yin Yoga? Some Practice Tips To Get You Started.  

When you first come out of a Yin Yoga pose, you will have the urge to move slowly and may even want to groan and moan. The sensation in the body after a Yin Yoga pose is often referred to as the rebound effect or the echo of the pose. I often describe this sensation as a resonance. If you have ever rung a bell or gong, you know the sound is the strongest initially and then dissipates over time, until you eventually no longer hear the sound at all. The resonant sensation of a Yin pose in the body is like that. At first, the feeling is strong, then it gradually softens until you can no longer feel it. This is why we typically take a small rest time between poses. 

Yin Yoga is based on of Taoist Yoga. It emphasizes the connective tissues. In Yin, we practice relaxed floor based Asana’s (Yoga poses) often using the support of props when needed. Yin Yoga poses are typically held for two to five minutes at a time. Yin yoga postures gently stretch and rehabilitate the connective tissues that form our joints, allowing us to maintain and restore joint, fascia and muscle flexibility. 

Practicing and teaching Yin Yoga has been such a gift to myself and my students.

Give Yin a try and feel the difference.